The Art of Racing in The Rain

Have I told you how I liked watching Cesar Milan’s show on NGC? He is so cool! There was once episode wherein a little dog was acting so full of herself, she yaps around like she’s the boss. Cesar Milan said that dogs should be reminded of what they are: dogs. Sometimes dog owners love their dogs so much they treat them as children. HUMAN children.

This book, if it were human, would scream at Cesar Milan, “you are wrong!” Well, I AGREE! (Humbly agree. My opinion.) When you read, you have a dog’s point of view but with human eyes. Enzo–the name of the dog–might receive purely what pets receive: a pat in the head, a dog treat, a rub on his tummy, a leash among others. Enzo’s feelings, however, toward every situation is humane enough (which I’d like to think as) above a canine’s capability. After reading, you would hate to follow Cesar Milan’s principle.

This books reminds me of Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend. Like Budo, Enzo had a reason to stay. The first few words of the book tells us the nearing death of Enzo. He was already in pain but he was not about to leave without fixing some things.

I think I wept 3 times:
1) … around 48% of reading, Dearest Eve died. Like Enzo’s death, her death was hinted already. Denny fell fast for her. It’s no wonder since Eve was beautiful inside as she was beautiful outside. I truly liked her especially when she tried to reach out to Enzo. But Eve had a demon trying to control her. Denny was always away for his exhilirating races and the neglect could grow and feed on her demon. With Enzo’s insight, I truly understand how sometimes her demon comes out. When the demon finally had the upper hand, it was so emotional. It was the start of Denny’s downfall. 

2) …  at 49% to 81% was the beginning of end. Everyone was scheming for Denny’s destruction. I never vehemently hated grandparents before as the grandparents of Eve. Although they had a point. Denny was seldom around. Even if he had done everything he could to help Eve (even I can see), it wasn’t enough. STILL! It doesn’t mean that they had the right to manipulate the situation! To take the child away from him when they know he was grieving along with them? Do they actually have a heart? Were they the judge and the jury? Were they given the position to punish Denny? For Denny’s courage and perseverance I respected him a lot more. He almost allowed himself to give up. Luckily, Enzo was on his side. Even after that sex offender business, Enzo was there for him. 

3.) … 90%-92% when Denny said “You can go”, my eyes were watery already. Denny was giving Enzo the permission. It was heartbreaking! Enzo was ALWAYS there for him. Enzo who had been a bad dog, a good dog, a playful dog, was Denny’s strength. They had went through a lot and had shared everything. Enzo never gave up for Denny’s sake. And for Enzo to leave after the battle was done… 

Let me cite an additional to #2: While I swept some watery residue off my cheeks, I was also very very angry. Two emotions clashing is very dangerous. Perhaps that was what Denny was feeling, probably more than 2 emotions. It became despicable along the way as Denny became miserable. I feel the helplessness of Enzo. If only he could strike down a huge tree like a thunder can, he would do so. If he could help Denny in more ways a human can do… Enzo would. Never have I argumentatively hate the limitations of being a dog.

There were only a handful of characters but they were rich in personality. Either you despise some of them or admire a few. Still, all of them had a reality. You can sense that “this can happen to anybody” and these characters could have been inspired by true people. It became believable. What is believable makes a beautiful story. The ending was particularly good! A boy named Enzo? Well, it looked like a dream come true for a dog who aspired to be more! A life of a dog might be ordinary or common. But Enzo’s life was worth telling.

 

Taken from my review

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