Inside St. Peter’s Basilica

( Have I apologized already, for some of my awful pictures? The talent I can’t truly master: photography. )

Hello, fellow tourists! I know you’re excited to see what’s inside. I was pretty giddy myself. But that’s a very inappropriate reaction.

Welcome guests, and get ready to be awed. You are entering one of the holy places in the world. But before we get in, it’s hard not to notice the designs surrounding the entrance.

On another side, a list of names of important people are embedded on stone and displayed for everyone to see.

I don’t know the roles they play specifically in History.

If you do, feel free to share and leave comments. 🙂

Okay folks, step right in and drink in the sights. What do you see?

The first thing I saw upon entering, was the ceiling.

The windows illuminated the area, providing an entrancing glow.

The flickering gold added a rich touch.

Part of the ceiling of course, is the dome.

Let’s not forget the statues on every pillars, walls and corners.

It’s not a church without them.

Zooming in the statue:

So much love and expertise were poured into these arts.

They are very complex, intricate and detailed.

It got pretty tiresome to keep on craning one’s neck. Here’s something within eye level:

Then the PietĂ . I could hardly miss this.

Who could forget the beloved Pope John Paul II?

John Paul II instituted the practice of hearing confessions in St. Peter’s Basilica on Good Friday, apparently becoming the first pope in history to hear the confessions of ordinary Catholics. ~Ken Untener

While we (ehem, tourists) were busy taking pictures, it was just my luck (or blessing) to snap one, of a sister on her bent knees and with her head down.

All in all, the Basilica was truly beautiful.

I am so blessed to have stepped foot inside.

Like the sister who was praying, it felt like every prayer you make in this church is a million times powerful than doing it somewhere else. I know it may sound melodramatic or hyperbolic, but I can’t deny it.

Like, all of my sins were flushed out even if I had not had a confession with a priest in that church. I know the sea of tourists made the whole experience too ‘marketplace’. If they were there for their religious calling, or for a pilgrimage, or wanting to be closer to the Heavenly Father, or simply passing by, it’s harsh to criticize immediately on the visitors. They paid for the expenses, therefore they’re entitled to be there.

If you’re a tourist like me, let’s continue our journey the way we want it!

I hope I’ve shown you enough passable photos to convince you to visit St. Peter’s Basilica even once.

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