Tales of the Peculiar (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #0.5)

Why I picked this book

Yoohoo, a fan of Peculiar Children! Rumor says, Mr. Riggs is releasing another book. I felt, What? A sequel? Can’t be. It’s going to ruin the whole thing. Well, thank goodness it isn’t! Bookstores were selling it so hot while the movie Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children was on. It was a bit expensive but I couldn’t wait!

Two sentences summary

Millard shares stories of long ago Peculiars; both real events and fictional. Unlike the trilogy, this book doesn’t have much pictures.

My favorite characters

The Cannibals are wise…creatures. I love how business-like they are in the most despicable way. I know they are evil but, it’s not their fault why their evil cultivated and grew.

The  ghost-talking woman is another endearing character. Maybe because I can relate. I often am desperate to find someone to talk to. It’s pretty much lonely to keep a conversation only in my head. However, I wouldn’t go to such extent as she does.

The nightmare physician. I love her character! She’s a strong example of a woman! I love the spin of the story. She isn’t a typical character depicting a peculiar, she became something more. And even without powers!

The boy on the sea. A beautiful character too. I’m not talking about the physique. I’m talking about the journey he takes and his experiences. I’m talking about his personality, changing throughout his life and settling with a final one I very much approve of.

My favorite scenes

Most of my characters are shown in all of my favorite scenes.  I could enumerate them without spoiling you so much. But I’m warning you, it’s pretty tough to leave out details.

  1. The story of the Cannibals is the first one. And what a story! This alone has captured my attention. It has a very unique telling of human (although these are peculiar) greed, envy and discontentment. It’s creepy but a great start for the book. I don’t think I’ve read something like this.
  2. The woman who could talk with ghosts shows how lonely it is to be alone. It is a relatable story to all loners not by choice. Add a little spice of romance, I am caught in! Also, I miss the idea of letter writing. It’s more personal and authentic.
  3. The girl who can take away the nightmares is a special story. One that will stay in my heart. If at first you know what the direction of the story is, the author throws a curve ball and boom! First impression wrong! I love the twist of the story. I love how it confuses the right from the wrong; the good from the bad; the short term from the long term. I just love how the story ended!
  4. The boy who can hold back the sea I like so much. It somehow reminds me of the Bible when Moses led his people out of Egypt. They were ungrateful, impatient and a very demanding lot! You try to help them but what do they give you in return? Contempt! Same with the people surrounding the boy in this story. Nearing the end, I was hoping this boy would grow a spine and tell them To hell with you all! Well, it was a wish come true.

What I don’t like

  1. Too few stories.
  2. I hate the ending of the Cocobolo. Too depressing.
  3. Other stories not mentioned here.

Last words

Exciting! I love this book! It’s been a while since I read short stories. This was a fun read.

Some stories had me pausing for a while and just… internalize the message delivered. For me, this action is a huge deal. Sometimes I stop reading so that I can figure out the plot or the ending or plainly calm my nerves. For this book… I stop because I am pondering. Philosophy or stuff like it never appeal to me much. This book made me to! What an amazing reaction.

Like fables, I developed a love on the idea of understanding human behavior. It’s not a deep development but still…a little affinity is growing in me. The question why we do the way we do is unanswerable yet still a very good question

Maybe I’m taking this thing too seriously. However, that’s a proof of how good the book is!

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