Venice WITHOUT the Waters

Do you have pictures you wish you knew why you took them in the first place? I have just about the same dilemma. But you know what, I’m gonna mix them up with photos that were snapped for a reason. Let me try it out right now with this post. 🙂

Like the previous posts, We’ll turn back time and visit a younger version of me; specifically on October 2012.

Venice, without showing you the Gondolas, the waters, and the lovebirds, is still Venice.
Take for example, the St. Marks Square. (And the tourists)

In Venice, the laws state that no matter where you want to go, you will always be drawn back to St. Mark’s Square. Even though you know it will be immensely crowded, and even though you have nothing in particular to do there, you will still feel yourself drawn. ~ David Levathan

Looking ahead, there’s the St. Mark’s Clock Tower.

From the top:

The Wikipedia calls them The Moors.

In atlasobscura, this winged lion is said to be the patron saint and symbol of Venice.

Quoting tickitaly, “The main clock face consists of a number of concentric dials. The outermost displays numbers 1 to 24 in Roman numerals – a hand decorated with an image of the sun pointing to the hour. A second dial shows the 12 signs of the zodiac; these are illuminated in gilt on an enarmel blue background. The inner dials (also gilt on blue) show the phases of the moon and sun. The clock also moves a display above the face, where a niche with the Madonna and baby Jesus sits between two displays: here we see the hours in Roman numerals; the minutes are show in Hindu-Arabic numerals. At certain points during the day, Virgin and Child emerge to rotate and then hide away once again. During Ascension week and Epiphany, another treat is in store for visitors, as statues of the Three Wise Men emerge to pass in front of Mary and Jesus.

Let’s put on the spotlight to the Basilica…in pieces. (Trying to interpret my actions back then, I don’t know why I didn’t take a picture of the Cathedral AS A WHOLE)

Did you know that this Cathedral adopts so many names?   Basilica Cattedrale Patriarcale di San Marco, Basilica di San Marco, Basilica of St. Mark, St. Mark’s Basilica

Apparently when I’m not zooming on the parts of the Cathedral, I snap on the towering tips:

Before you step on the piazza and see these buildings, there’s one statue that declares an air of attention:

To the King who was the first to unify Italy, Vittorio Emanuele the First.

Depicted here as charging ablaze, you will see this beloved King not only in Venice but in all parts of Italy.

Okay, that’s enough information for the day. How about a lighter topic; remember the first 2 sentences of this post?
Introducing the flags attached on buildings:

Don’t ask me about my fascination of them. Just know that they’re there. When you visit Venice and somehow glance at them, I hope you’ll think of me…and have a good chuckle about it. XD

I hope you enjoy your walk around the place! Remember: you don’t need to see boats and some water in between buildings to prove you’re in Venice. 🙂

 

Advertisements

5 Comments

  1. Pingback: Google
  2. Pingback: Homepage

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s